Mar

14

By Karen

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Categories: Hormone Disrupting Chemicals, Toxic Contaminants, unassessed ingredients

Tags: , , , ,

Gisele and that Poison Sunscreen Outburst.

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While promoting the launch of her natural skin care range, the model Gisele Bundchen, in a statement regarding sunscreens was quoted as saying “I cannot put this poison on my body”

Gisele continued, “ I do not use anything synthetic”

And then the world of the ‘experts’ erupted; forcing the model to retract and qualify her comments, claiming the language barrier had caused her to be misquoted. In a further statement, Ms Bundchen stated she only uses products that don’t contain ‘harsh’ chemicals such as parabens, Oxybenzone, PABA and Retinyl Palmitate.

Choose sunscreen with out the toxic chemicals.

The head of Brazil’s National Cancer Institute claimed sunscreen is of “fundamental importance” for preventing cancer, even though there is no evidence or studies to support this statement.

Professor Ian Olver, head of Cancer Council Australia was less emotional when asked for a response on the topic. He said “The real message is that the damage that UV light can do to your skin is so great, not only the risk of cancer but also of premature ageing of the skin, that if you have enough exposure to cause a tan you’ve done the damage to trigger off skin cancer and to damage the skin that will later show up as premature ageing,”

Prof Olver went on to comment on nanoparticles in sunscreens by saying there hasn’t been evidence of harm, but there was a ‘good argument’ for labeling the products so consumers could make informed decisions.

The fact that nanoparticles in skin care products is a relatively new science means there have not been sufficient studies to qualify them as a safe ingredient. Some scientists warn against the technology as more products enter the market ahead of research results. One researcher fears nanoparticles could be the next asbestos disaster.

Then there is the subject of the chemical Oxybenzone.  The Center of Disease Control released a study in 2008 showing the majority of the American population (97%) was contaminated with oxybenzene, which is widely used in sunscreens. This chemical has been linked to cell damage, hormone disruption, allergies and low birth weight in baby girls whose mothers were exposed during pregnancy. Oxybenzone is also a penetration enhancer, which means it can deliver other chemicals deeper into the skin tissue.

Sunlight causes Oxybenzone to form free radical chemicals that may be linked to cell damage. Children are particularly vulnerable as their skin surface; relative to body weight is much greater. Because of this fact, the potential dose of the chemical following skin application is likely to be 1.4 times greater than in adults. Children have less ability to excrete toxins from their bodies and their developing organs put them at greater risk of developing later-in-life disease triggered by exposure to chemicals.

Yet the last safety review of oxybenzone undertaken by the FDA (or any other governing body) was in the 1970s. The use of sunscreens has increased, but so has the rate of skin cancers.

Consider a sunscreen with out oxybenzone at www.vieworganics.com

“Sunscreens were never developed to prevent skin cancer,” Zoe Diana Draelos, editor of the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology said in a 2010 report. “In fact, there is no evidence to recommend that sunscreens prevent skin cancer in humans.”

Vitamin D is essential to our bodies’ well being and a measured amount of sunlight, about 20 minutes, either before or after the hottest part of the day is a healthier option than taking a pill. The choice of a sunscreen with the sheen of a reflective barrier of zinc, avoiding all creams containing chemicals, is the best advise.

It is a pity Gisele Bundchen didn’t stick to the originally quoted statement.
She may be on to something.
If public opinion is stirred enough, the powers that be could be shamed into completing the long awaited research. After 30 years, the FDA released a draft in October  ’09, but continues to delay finalizing the safety standards.

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